The Voice of the Bard

Hear the voice of the Bard!
Who Present, Past, & Future sees;
Whose ears have heard
The Holy Word,
That walk’d among the ancient trees…
(William Blake)

A Bard is the one in a noble house who sings its history, a voice that connects us to our fathers and God.

Music as a path — a weekly letter with recordings:
ishmaelwallace.ck.page/1c7fda45fe

My podcast, The Voice of the Bard: https://pod.fan/the-will-of-the-tones

  1. The Minstrel-Boy
  2. Will Ye No Come Back Again?
  3. The Bonnie Banks of Loch Lomond
  4. Heart of Wisdom (Ishmael Wallace)
  5. March for piano (Ishmael Wallace)
  6. Arioso for piano (Ishmael Wallace)
  7. Andante for piano (Ishmael Wallace)
  8. Amazing Grace
  9. Pipers for piano (Ishmael Wallace)
  10. El Novio de la Muerte (The Bridegroom of Death)
  11. A Full Heart (Ishmael Wallace)
  12. Sonnenuntergang (Hölderlin/Cornelius)
  13. Forward (March for piano) (Ishmael Wallace)
  14. Into the Light (March for piano) (Ishmael Wallace)
  15. Gute Nacht (Good Night)
  16. By the Grave for piano (Ishmael Wallace)
  17. Lifting Up the Banner (March for Piano) (Ishmael Wallace)
  18. Sugar Cane (Vals Venezolano for Piano) (Ishmael Wallace)
  19. Sweet Beulah Land (Squire Enos Parsons Jr.)
  20. Coming Home (Waltz for Piano) (Ishmael Wallace)
  21. Persephone (Waltz for Piano) (Ishmael Wallace)
  22. At Dusk (March for Piano) (Ishmael Wallace)
  23. A Keepsake (for piano) (Ishmael Wallace)
  24. To __ (Waltz for Piano) (Ishmael Wallace)
  25. March of the Frogs (Ishmael Wallace)
  26. Warm Heart Polka (Ishmael Wallace)
  27. Epitaph for Piano (Ishmael Wallace)
  28. Ballade for Piano (Ishmael Wallace)
  29. Forget Me Not (Ländler for Piano) (Ishmael Wallace)
  30. From the Garden (for piano) (Ishmael Wallace)
  31. Und was bekam des Soldaten Weib? (Weill / Brecht)
  32. Old Saying (for piano) (Ishmael Wallace)
  33. Country Dance for piano (Ishmael Wallace)
  34. Carnations (Tango for piano) (Ishmael Wallace)
  35. Song of the Fellowship for piano (Ishmael Wallace)
  36. Bittersweet (Ishmael Wallace)
  37. East Coker (Country Dance for piano) (Ishmael Wallace)
  38. Waving Goodbye (March for piano) (Ishmael Wallace)
  39. Spring Breeze for piano (Ishmael Wallace)
  40. Flower for piano (Ishmael Wallace)
  41. A Voice From Long Ago for piano (Ishmael Wallace)
  42. Archers of the Dawn for piano (Ishmael Wallace)
  43. Garland for piano (Ishmael Wallace)
  44. Happy End for piano (Ishmael Wallace)
  45. Eulalie (Stephen C. Foster)
  46. Leezie Lindsay (Scottish Traditional)
  47. Skye Boat Song (words: Sir Harold Boulton; music: Scottish Traditional)
  48. Beau Ideal (March for piano) (Ishmael Wallace)
  49. Dewdrop for piano (Ishmael Wallace)
  50. In the dark mirror (for piano) (Ishmael Wallace)
  51. Gemütlich (for piano) (Ishmael Wallace)
  52. Wild Flower (for piano) (Ishmael Wallace)
  53. Striking Root (for piano) (Ishmael Wallace)
  54. Chiaroscuro (for piano) (Ishmael Wallace)
  55. Golden Days (Idyll for piano) (Ishmael Wallace)
  56. Our Father (setting of the Lord’s Prayer) (Ishmael Wallace)
  57. Agartha Song from the opera Sophia (Ishmael Wallace)
  58. Ave Maria (Ishmael Wallace)
  59. Aia Maria (trans. J.R.R. Tolkien) (Ishmael Wallace)
  60. The White Rose of June (words: Carolina Oliphant, Baroness Nairne; music: Scottish Traditional)
  61. Wie lange noch? (Weill / Mehring)
  62. Lili Marleen (Schulze / Leip)
  63. Das Lied von den braunen Inseln (Weill / Feuchtwanger)
  64. September Song (Weill / Anderson)
  65. Rock’d in the Cradle of the Deep (Knight / Willard)
  66. Nanna’s Lied (Weill / Brecht)
  67. Flow Gently, Sweet Afton (Spilman / Burns)
  68. The Leaving of Liverpool (Traditional)
  69. Take Me Home, Country Roads (Danoff, Nivert, Denver)
  70. Old Folks at Home (Stephen Foster)
  71. Wayfaring Stranger (Traditional)
  72. Livin’ On Love (Alan E. Jackson)
  73. The Splendour Falls (Walthew, Tennyson)
  74. Four Green Fields (Tommy Makem)
  75. Lord of the Dance (Brackett, Carter)
  76. Lonesome Valley Medley (Thomas Land, Traditional)
  77. Nature Boy (eden ahbez)
  78. Heimweh (Luise Reichardt, F. G. Wetzel)
  79. Edward (Traditional Scottish)
  80. Geordie (Traditional English)
  81. Don’t Think Twice, It’s All Right (Bob Dylan)
  82. The Unquiet Grave (Traditional English)
  83. Searching for Lambs (Traditional English)
  84. I’ll Overcome Someday (Charles A. Tindley)
  85. Sometimes I Feel Like A Motherless Child (Traditional Spiritual)

1. The Minstrel-Boy

Words: Thomas Moore (1779 — 1852) from Irish Melodies; Music: The Moreen, old Irish song

The Minstrel-Boy to the war is gone, 

In the ranks of death you’ll find him; 

His father’s sword he has girded on, 

And his wild harp slung behind him. 

“Land of song!” said the warrior-bard, 

“Though all the world betrays thee, 

One sword, at least, thy rights shall guard, 

One faithful harp shall praise thee!” 

The Minstrel fell! — but the foeman’s chain 

Could not bring his proud soul under; 

The harp he loved ne’er spoke again, 

For he tore its chords asunder; 

And said, “No chains shall sully thee, 

Thou soul of love and bravery! 

Thy songs were made for the pure and free, 

They shall never sound in slavery.” 

(as performed on Ishmael’s podcast, The Voice of the Bard: https://pod.fan/the-will-of-the-tones)

The Minstrel-Boy is poet, musician, and warrior in one. In this, he touches an archetype; the Greek god Apollo is god not only of archery but music and poetry. Music and war are aspects of heroic life.

He’s joined “the ranks of death”, an ordering of men above which Death broods; he goes to war wearing “his father’s sword” — no longer an individual, but the representative of generations. His harp is “wild” because it gives voice to Nature: a harp is touched directly by the fingers (unlike a piano string), and may be sounded by a breeze. 

The harp is a heart: the heart of a nation. The nation exists in the songs of poets. It is like the Christ: not of the world; abandoned by all… But the Minstrel-Boy will stay by its side. This battle is not about utility, but principle. 

The boy falls; he lies dead on the earth, unmoving. But his “proud soul” is free. His soul, in a way a musician will understand, WAS his harp, and he takes the harp with him into death. 

A soul that is ruled by the external is not “pure”. It’s better to flee —even to flee the body — than to live beneath an alien chain.

The song of the soul must not be caught by the world.

2. Will Ye No Come Back Again?

(traditional Scottish melody; words by Lady Carolina Oliphant, Baroness Nairne)

As C.S. Lewis suggests in Mere Christianity, this world is God’s, but under enemy occupation. I must be loyal, as the Jacobites to their King across the water:

Bonnie Chairlie’s noo awa’,
Safely ower the friendly main;
Mony a heart will break in twa,
Should he ne’er come back again.
Chorus:
Will ye no come back again?
Will ye no come back again?
Better lo’ed ye canna be,
Will ye no come back again?

Ye trusted in your Hielan’ men,
They trusted you dear Chairlie.
They kent your hidin’ in the glen,
Death or exile bravin’.
Chorus

We watched thee in the gloamin’ hour,
We watched thee in the mornin’ grey.
Tho’ thirty thousand pounds they gie,
O there is nane that wad betray.
Chorus

Sweet the laverock’s note and lang,
Liltin’ wildly up the glen.
But aye tae me he sings ae sang,
Will ye no’ come back again?
Chorus

gloamin’ = twilight
laverock = skylark

3. The Bonnie Banks of Loch Lomond

Scottish traditional Jacobite song

By yon bonnie banks and by yon bonnie braes,
Where the sun shines bright on Loch Lomond,
Where me and my true love were ever wont to gae,
On the bonnie, bonnie banks o' Loch Lomond.
Chorus:
O ye'll tak' the high road, and I'll tak' the low,
And I'll be in Scotland afore ye,
But me and my true love will never meet again,
On the bonnie, bonnie banks o' Loch Lomond.
'Twas there that we parted, in yon shady glen,
By the steep, steep side o' Ben Lomond,
Where deep in purple hue, the Hieland hills we view,
And the moon comin' out in the gloamin'.
Chorus
The wee birdies sing, and the wild flowers spring
And in sunshine the waters are sleeping,
But the broken heart, it kens nae second spring again,
Though the waeful may cease frae their grieving. Chorus

Bonnie = pretty; braes = hills; Loch Lomond: a lake in Scotland; gae = walk; high road = main road; low road = death; Ben Lomond = a mountain on the eastern shore of the Loch; Hieland = Highland, upcountry; gloamin’ = twilight; wee = tiny; ken = to know; waeful = woeful, sorrowful; frae = from

4. Heart of Wisdom

Words from the Prajñāpāramitāhṛdaya, Heart of Perfect Wisdom; music by Ishmael Wallace

Form is emptiness, emptiness is form: the Mystery of Incarnation. Gone, gone, crossed over, all crossed over, awakened — hail!

5. March for piano

By Ishmael Wallace

6. Arioso for piano

By Ishmael Wallace

7. Andante for piano

By Ishmael Wallace

8. Amazing Grace

Words by John Newton; music by William Walker

9. Pipers for piano

By Ishmael Wallace

10. El Novio de la Muerte (The Bridegroom of Death)

The unofficial hymn of La Legión Española. Words by Fidel Prado Duque, music by Juan Costa Casals. A synopsis:

“None knew his story, but the regiment guessed a pain gnawed at his heart. If asked, he’d reply reluctantly, ‘I am a man struck by the paw of Fortune; I am bridegroom of Death…’

Where the enemy’s fire was fiercest, he advanced, and died retrieving the Flag.

When at last they recovered his body, on his chest they found a letter and the portrait of a woman divinely beautiful. She wrote in the letter, ‘If God calls you, save a place for me; I will come right away’, and bade him a last farewell.

To be at your side, I became the bridegroom of Death…”

11. A Full Heart

For piano; by Ishmael Wallace

12. Sonnenuntergang

Poem by Friedrich Hölderlin, music by Peter Cornelius

Sunset

Where are you? Drunk on all your joys,
My soul goes into night; for a moment ago
I listened, as, full of golden
Tones, the lovely Sun Youth

Played his song of evening on a heavenly lyre;
It resounded all around the woods and hills.
But he’s gone far away, to pious
Peoples who still give him honor.

(translation by Ishmael Wallace)

Sonnenuntergang

Wo bist du? trunken dämmert die Seele mir
Von all deinen Wonnen; denn eben ist’s,
Daß ich gelauscht, wie goldner Töne
Voll der entzückende Sonnenjüngling

Sein Abendlied auf himmlischer Leier spielt’;
Es tönten rings die Wälder und Hügel nach.
Doch fern ist er zu frommen Völkern,
Die ihn noch ehren, hinweggegangen.

13. Forward! (March for Piano)

By Ishmael Wallace

14. Into the Light (March for Piano)

By Ishmael Wallace

15. Gute Nacht (Good Night)

Poem by Wilhelm Müller, music by Franz Schubert. First song in the cycle Winterreise, Winter Journey.

A translation by Ishmael Wallace:

Good Night

A stranger, I came,
A stranger, I go.
The May-time was gracious,
With many a pretty posy.
The girl spoke of love,
The mother, even marriage;
Now the world is dark,
The way veiled in snow.

I cannot choose the hour
Of my departure,
Must grope in this darkness
For my own way.
For companion, a shadow
Cast by the Moon,
I search the white moors
For wild things’ tracks.

Why should I wait
To be tossed out?
Let stray dogs howl
Outside their house!
Love likes to wander —
God has made it so —
From one to another;
My darling, good night!

It would be a shame
To disturb your dreams —
You shall not hear my step.
I gently close the door.
In going out, I’ll write
On the gate, “Good night”,
So you may see I’d thought
Of you.

16. By the Grave for piano

By Ishmael Wallace

17. Lifting Up the Banner (March for Piano)

By Ishmael Wallace

18. Sugar Cane (Vals Venezolano for Piano)

By Ishmael Wallace

19. Sweet Beulah Land

By Squire Enos Parsons, Jr.

20. Coming Home (Waltz for Piano)

By Ishmael Wallace

21. Persephone (Waltz for Piano)

By Ishmael Wallace

22. At Dusk (March for Piano)

By Ishmael Wallace

23. A Keepsake (for piano)

By Ishmael Wallace

24. To __ (Waltz for Piano)

By Ishmael Wallace

25. March of the Frogs

By Ishmael Wallace

26. Warm Heart Polka

By Ishmael Wallace

27. Epitaph for Piano

By Ishmael Wallace

28. Ballade for Piano

By Ishmael Wallace

29. Forget Me Not (Ländler for Piano)

By Ishmael Wallace

30. From the Garden (for piano)

By Ishmael Wallace

31. Und was bekam des Soldaten Weib? (Weill / Brecht)

A taste of The Voice of the Bard podcast: https://pod.fan/the-will-of-the-tones

“And what did the soldier’s wife receive? From Prague, high heels; from Oslo, a fur piece; from Amsterdam, a hat; from Brussels, lace; from Paris, a silk dress; from Bucharest, a shirt; from the wide spaces of Russia, a widow’s veil.”

32. Old Saying (for piano)

By Ishmael Wallace

33. Country Dance for piano

By Ishmael Wallace

34. Carnations (Tango for piano)

By Ishmael Wallace

35. Song of the Fellowship for piano

By Ishmael Wallace

36. Bittersweet for piano

By Ishmael Wallace

37. East Coker (Country Dance for piano)

By Ishmael Wallace

38. Waving Goodbye (March for piano)

By Ishmael Wallace

39. Spring Breeze for piano

By Ishmael Wallace

40. Flower for piano

By Ishmael Wallace

41. A Voice From Long Ago

By Ishmael Wallace

42. Archers of the Dawn

By Ishmael Wallace

43. Garland

By Ishmael Wallace

44. Happy End

By Ishmael Wallace

45. Eulalie

By Stephen C. Foster; as performed on Ishmael’s podcast, The Voice of the Bard: https://pod.fan/the-will-of-the-tones

  1. Bluebirds, linger here awhile,
    O’er this sacred grassy pile,
    Sing your sweetest songs to me
    ’Tis the grave of Eulalie.
    Roses white, around her tomb
    Gently wave and sweetly bloom,
    Let your silent language be
    “We will bloom for Eulalie.”
    Let your silent language be
    “We will bloom for Eulalie.”
  2. Streamlet, chanting at her feet
    Mournful music, sad and sweet,
    Wake her not, she dreams of me
    ’Neath the yew tree, Eulalie!
    Eulalie, but yesternight,
    Came a spirit veiled in white;
    I knew it could be none but thee,
    Bride of Death, lost Eulalie.
    I knew it could be none but thee,
    Bride of Death, lost Eulalie.
  3. Angels, guard her with your wings,
    Shield her from unholy things,
    Bid her dream love-dreams of me,
    Till I come, sleep, Eulalie!
    Bluebirds, linger here awhile,
    O’er this sacred grass pile,
    Sing your sweetest songs to me
    ’Tis the grave of Eulalie.
    Sing your sweetest songs to me
    ’Tis the grave of Eulalie.

46. Leezie Lindsay

Scottish Traditional; as performed on Ishmael’s podcast, The Voice of the Bard: https://pod.fan/the-will-of-the-tones

“Will ye gang to the Hielands, Leezie Lindsay?
   Will ye gang to the Hielands wi’ me?
Will ye gang to the Hielands, Leezie Lindsay,
   My bride and my darling to be?”

“To gang to the Hielands wi’ you, Sir,
   I dinna ken how that may be,
For I ken na’ the land that ye live in,
   Nor ken I the lad I’m gaun wi’.”

“O, Leezie, lass, ye maun ken little,
   If sae be ye dinna ken me;
My name is Lord Ronald MacDonald,
   A Chieftain o’ high degree.”

She has kilted her coats o’ green satin.
   She has kilted them up to the knee,
And she’s aff wi’ Lord Ronald MacDonald,
   His bride and his darling to be.

47. Skye Boat Song

Words by Sir Harold Boulton, 2nd Baronet of Copped Hall; music, Scottish Traditional.

As performed on Ishmael’s podcast, The Voice of the Bard:

https://pod.fan/the-will-of-the-tones

48. Beau Ideal (March for piano)

By Ishmael Wallace

49. Dewdrop for piano

By Ishmael Wallace

50. In the Dark Mirror for piano

By Ishmael Wallace

“…But whenever I find the key at times, and descend all the way into myself, where the images of destiny slumber in the dark mirror, I need only lean over the black mirror to see my own image, which now looks exactly like Him, Him, my friend and guide.” Hermann Hesse, Demian

51. Gemütlich for piano

By Ishmael Wallace

52. Wild Flower for piano

By Ishmael Wallace

53. Striking Root for piano

“Yea, there is strength in striking root and good in growing old.” G.K. Chesterton

By Ishmael Wallace

54. Chiaroscuro for piano

By Ishmael Wallace

55. Golden Days (Idyll for piano)

By Ishmael Wallace

56. Our Father (a setting of the Lord’s Prayer)

By Ishmael Wallace

57. Agartha Song from the opera Sophia

By Ishmael Wallace

Sophia, the ageless Queen of Agartha, has forgotten who she is, and believes herself a young woman of 1930s London. Her husband, His Majesty King Michael, appears in her boudoir to remind her of Agartha:

Agartha is the goblet
That holds the golden wine.

Agartha is the City
That holds the golden light.

The goblet is cracked since you are gone;
The walls, crumbled.
Agartha has slipped into the earth.

Agartha is the goblet
That holds the golden wine.
When you return, Agartha will rise again!

58. Ave Maria

a new setting by Ishmael Wallace

Ave Maria, gratia plena. Dominus tecum. Benedicta tu mulieribus, et benedictus fructus ventris tua, Iesus. Sancta Maria, Mater Dei, ora pro nobis, nunc et in hora mortis nostrae. Amen.

Hail, Mary, full of grace. The Lord is with thee. Blessed art thou amongst women, and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus. Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us, now and at the hour of our death. Amen.

59. Aia María

The Ave Maria prayer in Quenya, language of the High Elves; translation by J.R.R. Tolkien, music by Ishmael Wallace

Aia María quanta Eruanno,
i Héru aselye;
aistana elye imíca nísi
ar aistana i yáve mónalyo Yésus.
Aire María Eruo ontaril
á hyame rámen úcarindor
sí ar lúmesse ya firuvamme.
Násië.
Hail Mary, full of grace,
the Lord is with thee;
blessed art thou amongst women,
and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus.
Holy Mary, Mother of God,
pray for us sinners,
now and at the hour of our death.
Amen.

60. The White Rose of June

words: Carolina Oliphant, Baroness Nairne; music: Scottish Traditional

The White Rose of June

Now the bricht sun, and the soft simmer showers, 
Deck a' the woods and the gardens wi' flowers; 
But bonny and sweet though the hale o' them be, 
There's ane aboon a' that is dearest to me; 
An' oh, that's the white rose, the white rose o' June, 
An' may he that should wear it come back again sune! 

It's no on my breast, nor yet in my hair, 
That the emblem dear I venture to wear; 
But it blooms in my heart, and its white leaves I weet, 
When alane in the gloamin' I wander to greet, 
O'er the white rose, the white rose, the white rose o' June, 
An' may he that should wear it come back again sune! 

(verse 2 omitted in this performance)

Mair fragrant and rich the red rose may be, 
But there is nae spell to bind it to me; 
But dear to my heart and to fond memorie, 
Tho' scathed and tho' blighted the white rose may be. 
O the white rose, the white rose, the white rose o' June, 
O may he that should wear it come back again sune! 

An' oh! may the true hearts thy perils who share, 
Remember'd wi' tears, and remember'd in prayer. 
Whom misfortune's rude blast has sent far awa'. 
Fair breezes bring back sune to cottage and ha', — 
Then, O sing the white rose, the white rose o' June, 
An' may he that should wear it wear Scotland's auld croun!

61. Wie lange noch?

Music: Kurt Weill; lyric: Walter Mehring

A taste of my podcast, The Voice of the Bard.

“I will confess there was a night when I willingly gave myself to you. You possessed me and drove me from my senses… Look at me! When will the day come when I say to you: It’s over?”

62. Lili Marleen

Music: Norbert Schulze; lyric: Hans Leip

In front of the barracks, by the gate, stood a lamp. And if it still stands, there we will meet again, will stand beneath the lamp once again, Lili Marleen.

Our shadows merged; one could see right away how much we were in love. And everyone will see it when we stand beneath the lamp once again, Lili Marleen.

It knows your step, your walk; it shines all the evening, but has long forgotten me. If I should fall, who will stand with you beneath the lamp, Lili Marleen?

From the silence of space and the depths of the earth, arise, as in a dream, your loving lips. When the mist swirls late at night, I will stand once again beneath the lamp, Lili Marleen!

63. Das Lied von den braunen Inseln

Music: Kurt Weill; lyric: Lion Feuchtwanger

The song of the Brown Islands

“This is the song of the brown islands. The men are trash; the women, diseased. A she-ape is in business there; the fields wither in the oil’s stink. Going there, Freddy? Not me, Teddy. The dollar alone does not make me happy. Going there, Freddy? Not me Teddy. If I want to look at apes, I’ll go to the zoo. Those who go there are healthy, those who leave have lost their strength… The she-ape rules in bed and in the factory…”

64. September Song

Music: Kurt Weill; lyric: Maxwell Anderson (arr. Ishmael Wallace

Oh, it's a long, long while from May to December,
But the days grow short when you reach September.
When the autumn weather turns the leaves to flame,
One hasn't got time for the waiting game.
As the days dwindle down to a precious few,
September, November...
And these few precious days, I'd spend with you;
These golden days, I'd spend with you.

65. Rock’d in the Cradle of the Deep

Music: J. P. Knight; Text: Mrs. Emma Willard

Rock'd in the cradle of the deep
I lay me down in peace to sleep;
Secure I rest upon the wave
For thou, oh Lord, hast pow'r to save.
I know thou wilt not slight my call,
For thou dost mark the sparrow's fall!
And calm and peaceful is my sleep
Rock'd in the cradle of the deep.

And such the trust that still were mine
Though stormy winds swept o'er the brine,
Or though the tempest's fiery breath
Roused me from sleep to wreck and death!
In ocean cave still safe with thee,
The germ of immortality;
And calm and peaceful is my sleep
Rock'd in the cradle of the deep.

66. Nanna’s Lied

Music: Kurt Weill; lyric: Bertolt Brecht

Nanna’s Song

Bertolt Brecht; translation by Kim H. Kowalke

Gentlemen, I was only 17 when I landed on the love market. And I learned a lot of things — mostly bad, but that was the game. Still, I resented much of it. (After all, I am a human being). Thank God it all goes by quickly — both the love and sorrow. Where are the tears of last night? Where are the snows of years gone by?
As the years go by, it gets easier on the love market — easier to embrace a whole troop there. But it’s amazing how your feelings cool off when you’re stingy with them. (After all, everything gets used up eventually). Thank God it all goes by quickly…
And although you learn the tricks of the trade on the love market, it’s never easy to convert lust into small change. Still, it can be done, but meanwhile you get a little older. (After all, you can’t stay 17 forever). Thank God it all goes by quickly…

67. Flow Gently, Sweet Afton

Music: Jonathan Edwards Spilman (1812 — 1896); Words: Robert Burns (1759 — 1796)

Flow gently, sweet Afton, among thy green braes, 
Flow gently, I'll sing thee a song in thy praise; 
My Mary's asleep by thy murmuring stream, 
Flow gently, sweet Afton, disturb not her dream. 

Thou stock-dove, whose echo resounds thro' the glen, 
Ye wild whistling blackbirds in yon thorny den, 
Thou green-crested lapwing, thy screaming forbear, 
I charge you disturb not my slumbering fair. 

How lofty, sweet Afton, thy neighbouring hills, 
Far mark'd with the courses of clear winding rills; 
There daily I wander as noon rises high, 
My flocks and my Mary's sweet cot in my eye. 

How pleasant thy banks and green valleys below, 
Where wild in the woodlands the primroses blow; 
There oft, as mild Ev'ning sweeps over the lea, 
The sweet-scented birk shades my Mary and me. 

Thy crystal stream, Afton, how lovely it glides, 
And winds by the cot where my Mary resides, 
How wanton thy waters her snowy feet lave, 
As gathering sweet flowrets she stems thy clear wave. 

Flow gently, sweet Afton, among thy green braes, 
Flow gently, sweet river, the theme of my lays; 
My Mary's asleep by thy murmuring stream, 
Flow gently, sweet Afton, disturb not her dream. 

68. The Leaving of Liverpool

Traditional.

“It’s not the leaving of Liverpool that grieves me, but, my darling, when I think of thee.”

69. Take Me Home, Country Roads

By Bill Danoff, Taffy Nivert, and John Denver; arranged by Ishmael Wallace

70. Old Folks at Home

By Stephen C. Foster; arranged by Ishmael Wallace

71. Wayfaring Stranger

Traditional, arranged by Ishmael Wallace

72. Livin’ On Love

By Alan E. Jackson, arranged by Ishmael Wallace

73. The Splendour Falls

Words: Alfred, Lord Tennyson (from “The Princess”); Music: R. H. Walthew

74. Four Green Fields

By Tommy Makem, arranged by Ishmael Wallace

“What did I have?” said the fine old woman,
“What did I have?” this proud old woman did say,
“I had four green fields, each one was a jewel,
But strangers came and tried to take them from me.
I had fine strong sons, they fought to save my jewels.
They fought and they died, and that was my grief” said she.

“Long time ago” said the fine old woman,
“Long time ago” this proud old woman did say,
“There was war and death, plundering and pillage,
My children starved by mountain valley and sea;
And their wailing cries, they shook the very heavens,
My four green fields ran red with their blood” said she.

“What have I now?” said the fine old woman,
“What have I now?” this proud old woman did say,
“I have four green fields, one of them’s in bondage
In strangers’ hands, that tried to take it from me,
But my sons have sons, as brave as were their fathers;
My fourth green field will bloom once again” said she.

75. Lord of the Dance

Words: Sydney Carter; Music: Elder Joseph Brackett; arranged by Ishmael Wallace

76. Lonesome Valley Medley

“Tom Dooley”, by Thomas Land; “Down in the Valley”, traditional; “Jesus Walked This Lonesome Valley”, traditional. Arranged by Ishmael Wallace

77. Nature Boy

Words and music by eden ahbez. Arranged by Ishmael Wallace

There was a boy, a very strange, enchanted boy;
They say he wandered very far, very far, over land and sea;
A little shy and sad of eye, but very wise was he.

And then one day, a magic day, he passed my way,
And while we spoke of many things, fools and kings, this he said to me:
"The greatest thing you'll ever learn 
Is just to love and be loved in return”.

78. Heimweh

Words: F. G. Wetzel (1779 — 1819); Music: Luise Reichardt (1779 — 1826)

"When the roses bloom,
Hope, dear heart;
Quiet and cool, the hot pain
Will burn out.
Though over the winter,
It often seemed there was no cure,
The fever will subside
When the roses bloom.

When the roses bloom,
Heart dull and tormented,
Be happy -- we will go
Towards Heaven.
Eternally recovered,
You will glow anew,
Become a heavenly being
When the roses bloom."

79. Edward

Traditional Scottish ballad, arranged by Ishmael Wallace. The words of this version after Sir David Dalrymple, the melody after Jean Ritchie.

“Why does your sword drip with blood?…I have killed my hawk so good…I have killed my red-roan steed…I have killed my father dear…The curse of hell from me shall ye bear, such counsels ye gave me…”

80. Geordie

Traditional English ballad, arranged by Ishmael Wallace

81. Don’t Think Twice, It’s All Right

Bob Dylan, arr. Ishmael Wallace

82. The Unquiet Grave

Traditional English, arr. Ishmael Wallace

83. Searching for Lambs

Traditional English, arr. Ishmael Wallace

84. I’ll Overcome Someday

Hymn by Charles Albert Tindley, published 1900; arr. Ishmael Wallace

85. Sometimes I Feel Like A Motherless Child

Traditional Spiritual; arr. Ishmael Wallace

My weekly letter on music and meaning: new music and essays every Wednesday (free)

My podcast, The Voice of the Bard: https://pod.fan/the-will-of-the-tones

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